Sitting Pretty

Here’s another shot taken in 2008 at the Wings Over Houston air show, processed as a three-shot HDR merge using Photomatix Pro. I took all three shots hand-held using a High Speed HDR technique I learned a few years back.

Sitting Pretty

Sitting Pretty – Houston, Texas
Copyright © 2008 Jeff Lynch Photography
Shot taken with a Canon EOS 40D set on aperture priority (Av) using an EF-S 17-85mm f/4-5.6 IS USM lens hand-held. The three exposures used for this HDR image were taken at 17mm and f11 at ISO 200 using a B&W circular polarizer. All post capture processing was done in Adobe’s Lightroom 3 Beta & Photomatix Pro. Click on the image above for a larger version.

Two Views

I’ve really fallen in love with the incredible detail that results from tonemapping a multi-exposure HDR image. The two images shown here were created by merging seven different exposures that were taken using the techniques that John O’Connor explains in his Raindrops and Ferns-HDR post. The first image was converted to grayscale after tonemapping and the second was processed “normally” in Lightroom 2.

Shelter

Shelter B&W
Copyright © 2008 Jeff Lynch Photography
Shots taken with a Canon 40D tripod mounted, EF-S 10-22mm f/3.5-4.5 USM at 10mm, f/11 at ISO 100 on SanDisk digital film. The HDR file was made from seven RAW images tone-mapped in Photomatix Pro. It was converted to grayscale in Lightroom 2 and finished in Noise Ninja. Click on the image above for a larger version.

Shelter

Shelter
Copyright © 2008 Jeff Lynch Photography
Shots taken with a Canon 40D tripod mounted, EF-S 10-22mm f/3.5-4.5 USM at 10mm, f/11 at ISO 100 on SanDisk digital film. The HDR file was made from seven RAW images tone-mapped in Photomatix Pro. All other post capture processing was done in Lightroom 2 and Noise Ninja. Click on the image above for a larger version.

In the past few months of playing around with high dynamic range processing I’ve found that the secret to obtaining a really detailed HDR image is in eliminating any camera or subject movement “during and between each exposure”. This can be accomplished using the techniques that John explains or by using the High Speed HDR technique popularized by Uwe Steinmueller.

I’ve also found that (for me) Photomatix Pro 3.1 gives me the most realistic looking results and the lowest noise in my images. One final thing to remember is that almost every tonemapped image still needs some final “tweaking” in Lightroom or Photoshop to obtain the best results.

Black & White HDR Photography

Late last month I began experimenting with converting tonemapped HDR images into grayscale. I wanted to see how the extended shadow detail found in HDR images would look in B&W. I’ve found that tonemapped images produced from software such as Photomatix Pro almost mimic the grain found in B&W films such as Kodak’s TriX when they are converted to grayscale.

What do you think?

The Stables

The Stables
Copyright © 2008 Jeff Lynch Photography Shot taken with a Canon 40D hand-held, EF-S 17-85mm f/4-5.6 IS USM at 17mm, f/11 at ISO 200 on SanDisk digital film. The HDR file was made from three RAW images tone-mapped in Photomatix Pro. All other processing was done in Lightroom 2 and Noise Ninja. Click on the image above for a larger version.

Autumn Comes to Southeast Texas

The cooler temperatures, low humidity and autumn colors have finally begun to arrive in southeast Texas and all I can say is “Thank God”. It’s been a hot, humid summer and with all the roof repair work due to Hurricane Ike, we sure could use a break.

This image was taken Monday at the Monument Hill State Park near La Grange, Texas. The colors had just started to change and the mid-morning sun gave the trees a wonderful glow. I decided to process this as an HDR image using Photomatix Pro to see how the colors would turn out. Not too bad for a walk in the park.

Fall Colors Just Beginning to Show

Falls Colors Just Beginning to Show
Copyright © 2008 Jeff Lynch Photography
Shots taken with a Canon 40D hand-held, EF-S 17-85mm f/4-5.6 IS USM at 28mm, f/19 at ISO 200 on SanDisk digital film. The HDR file was made from three RAW images tone-mapped in Photomatix Pro. All other post capture processing was done in Lightroom 2 and Noise Ninja. Click on the image above for a larger version.

Going All the Way with HDR

Earlier this month I asked the question “How Far is Too Far with HDR?” in one of my posts and the answer I got back most often was “it’s up to the photographer to decide”. Well, that got me thinking and playing around with Photomatix Pro to see what kind of really far-out effects I could generate.

Happy Halloween!

Far, Far Out There

Far, Far Out There
Copyright © 2008 Jeff Lynch Photography
Shots taken with a Canon 40D hand-held, EF-S 17-85mm f/4-5.6 IS USM at 33mm, f/16 at ISO 100 on SanDisk digital film. The HDR file was made from three RAW images tone-mapped in Photomatix Pro. All other processing was done in Lightroom 2. Click on the image above for a larger version.

Things Are Looking Up

No, this isn’t a post about the economy or the current banking crisis. After seeing several examples of this type of image on Laurie Excell’s and Josh Bradley’s blogs I knew I had to give this a try.

A word of caution for those of us with a few years under our belts (that’s code for “Old Fart”), trust your tripod and your camera’s autofocus for this shot. Don’t hurt your back trying to compose this image in the viewfinder.

Things are Looking Up
Copyright © 2008 Jeff Lynch Photography
Shots taken with a Canon 40D tripod mounted, 17-40mm f/4L USM at 17mm, f/19 for 1/15th of a second at ISO 100 on SanDisk digital film. The image was made from three RAW images “exposure-blended” in Photomatix Pro. All other processing was done in Lightroom 2. Click on the image above for a larger version.

Texas Hill Country

Here’s the second image from last Friday’s visit to the Texas hill country. The day was perfect with temperatures in the mid-80’s and a strong breeze from the west. As you can tell from this image, it’s been a hot, dry summer in the hill country. By the way, the reddish color you see in the foreground is red clay which is prevalent throughout the region.

Texas Hill Country
Copyright © 2008 Jeff Lynch Photography
Shots taken with a Canon 40D tripod mounted, 17-40mm f/4L USM at 17mm, f/16 for 1/90th of a second at ISO 100 on SanDisk digital film. The image was made from three RAW files “exposure blended” in Photomatix Pro and finished using Nik’s Color Efex Pro and Lightroom 2’s develop module. Click on the image above for a larger version.