Wildlife Photography – Find the Unusual

Its always nice to find something unusual when shooting wildlife.

Here’s a shot I took last weekend at the Brazos Bend State Park near Needville, Texas. I watched this Egret for thirty minutes standing on one leg and hunting for dinner. Great balance!

One Legged Egret

One Legged Egret
Copyright Β© 2009 Jeff Lynch Photography
Shot taken with a Canon 50D set on aperture priority (Av), using an EF 300mm f/4L IS USM with an EF 1.4X II extender mono-pod mounted. The exposure was taken at 420mm, f/9.5 for 1/350th of a second at ISO 100 on Lexar Professional UDMA digital film. All post capture processing was done in Lightroom 2. Click on the image above for a larger version.

7 thoughts on “Wildlife Photography – Find the Unusual

  1. Thks jeff, again awesome pictures, man i’m stoked to have the best equipement i can afford, it’s been worth the wait, purchase the very best,, and you are half way there!!! πŸ™‚ πŸ™‚

  2. Hi, jeff, i was reading your windoows and door article, i noticed that you shots were at 1/20, and iso 100. Also noted alot of your wildlife is iso 100,, could you explain the “ISO” thing for us newbies, and the pro’s and cons… also i bought an extreme 4gb, high speed cf, i saw you are using lexar,, any pros, and cons.. it’s wonderful to buy this stuff once, and right the first time.Appreciate all of you shared advice here.
    I’m off to Chile next week for an aviation event, and hope to capture some good stuff for a change! My 100-400mm “L” just arrived, man that puppy is big.. going to need to grow some more biceps! πŸ™‚ πŸ™‚
    Don

    • Don,

      You can Google “DSLR ISO” and find lots of technical explanations about ISO settings but basically its a measurement of how sensitive you want your DSLR to be to light. The higher the ISO number, the greater the sensitivity. The downside is the higher the ISO setting used, the more digital “noise” will show up in your images. The best rule of thumb is to always use the lowest possible ISO setting at all times and only increase your ISO if there just isn’t enough light to make a good exposure.

      Jeff

  3. jeff, another stupid question, on my Cannon 40D how do i only use the center AF for focus.. as per your advice, or is there a special feature to turn of the others….
    I think you just look at the center and get it to turn “Red”.. thks don

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