Two Views

I’ve really fallen in love with the incredible detail that results from tonemapping a multi-exposure HDR image. The two images shown here were created by merging seven different exposures that were taken using the techniques that John O’Connor explains in his Raindrops and Ferns-HDR post. The first image was converted to grayscale after tonemapping and the second was processed “normally” in Lightroom 2.

Shelter

Shelter B&W
Copyright © 2008 Jeff Lynch Photography
Shots taken with a Canon 40D tripod mounted, EF-S 10-22mm f/3.5-4.5 USM at 10mm, f/11 at ISO 100 on SanDisk digital film. The HDR file was made from seven RAW images tone-mapped in Photomatix Pro. It was converted to grayscale in Lightroom 2 and finished in Noise Ninja. Click on the image above for a larger version.

Shelter

Shelter
Copyright © 2008 Jeff Lynch Photography
Shots taken with a Canon 40D tripod mounted, EF-S 10-22mm f/3.5-4.5 USM at 10mm, f/11 at ISO 100 on SanDisk digital film. The HDR file was made from seven RAW images tone-mapped in Photomatix Pro. All other post capture processing was done in Lightroom 2 and Noise Ninja. Click on the image above for a larger version.

In the past few months of playing around with high dynamic range processing I’ve found that the secret to obtaining a really detailed HDR image is in eliminating any camera or subject movement “during and between each exposure”. This can be accomplished using the techniques that John explains or by using the High Speed HDR technique popularized by Uwe Steinmueller.

I’ve also found that (for me) Photomatix Pro 3.1 gives me the most realistic looking results and the lowest noise in my images. One final thing to remember is that almost every tonemapped image still needs some final “tweaking” in Lightroom or Photoshop to obtain the best results.